Experimental cardiovascular electrophysiology and Imaging

Our group is funded by several grants, including an SFB 1002 A11 project grant from the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) entitled “Irregular ventricular activation - a novel mechanism impairing Ca2+-homeostasis and excitability in the transition to heart failure“. This project aims at investigating the effects of atrial fibrillation on ventricular calcium cycling. Research involves translational cellular electrophysiology and imaging, focusing on the mechanisms underlying hypertrophy, heart failure and arrhythmia generation, with the eventual aim of identifying novel therapeutic strategies. The majority of this research is carried out on human cardiac tissue, derived from heart transplant procedures and daily operations in the clinic. In addition to molecular biology techniques, we also use methods such as fluorescence microscopy, cardiac contractility recordings and patch-clamp.

There is particular focus on the significance and regulation of the so-called Ca2+ leak from the sarcoplasmic reticulum, which leads to loss of Ca2+ stores in the cell and plays a crucial role in heart failure and arrhythmias. In particular this research is directed towards regulatory proteins such as Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases and phosphatases, and their modulation as novel treatment options for heart failure and arrhythmias.

Other work in the laboratory involves investigation of the so-called late sodium current (INa,late), which has been shown to play an important role in the generation of arrhythmias and diastolic dysfunction in a variety of pathologies. We are studying the significance, regulation and inhibition of this current in heart failure and, in particular, atrial fibrillation. Currently being examined is the neuronal isoform of the sodium ion channel and its contribution to INa,late.

Furthermore we are investigating a multitude of pharmacological compounds for the treatment of heart failure and arrhythmias. These drugs include modulators of INa,late, neuronal sodium channel isoform, the ryanodine receptor, protein kinases and phosphatases. In addition we have recently begun investigations on the recombinant hormone Serelaxin.

Contact
Prof. Dr. Gerd Hasenfuß
Prof. Dr. Gerd Hasenfuß
Director of the Clinic for Cardiology and Pneumology / Group leader
Phone:
0551 39-20400
E-Mail:
rfaber@med.uni-goettingen.de
Prof. Dr. Samuel Sossalla
Associated group leader
Phone:
0551-39-9481
Fax:
0551-39-20966
E-Mail:
ssossalla@med.uni-goettingen.de
Dr. Shakil Ahmad
research associate
Phone:
0551-39-9481
Fax:
0551-39-8941
E-Mail:
drshakilahmad@live.com
Dr. rer. nat. Natalyia Dybkova
research associate
Phone:
+49 (0) 551 39-9481
E-Mail:
ndybkov@med.uni-goettingen.de
Kim Hansing
MTA
Phone:
0551-39-9481
Fax:
0551-39-8941
E-Mail:
kim.hansing@med.uni-goettingen.de
Dr. Nico Hartmann
research associate
Phone:
0551-39-9481
Fax:
0551-39-8941
E-Mail:
nico.hartmann@med.uni-goettingen.de
Jonas Herting
research associate
Phone:
0551-39-9481
Fax:
0551-39-8941
E-Mail:
jonas.herting@med.uni-goettingen.de
Dr. Fleur E Mason
research associate
Phone:
0551-39-9481
Fax:
0551-39-8941
E-Mail:
fleur.mason@med.uni-goettingen.de
Dr. med. Hanna Schotola
research associate
Phone:
+49 551 / 39 66051
Fax:
+49 551 / 39 13886
E-Mail:
hschotola@med.uni-goettingen.de
Timo Schulte
MTA
Phone:
0551-39-9481
E-Mail:
tschulte@med.uni-goettingen.de

PhD students

Inga Braun
Cand. med.
E-Mail:
Inga.B.Faho@gmx.de
Jörg Eiringhaus
Cand. med.
E-Mail:
joerg.eiringhaus@stud.uni-goettingen.de
Steffen Pabel
Cand. med.
E-Mail:
steffen.pabel@web.de
Astrid Kleinwächter
E-Mail:
astrid.kleinwaechter@googlemail.com
Anna Greinert
Cand. med.
E-Mail:
a.greinert@stud.uni-goettingen.de
Towhidul MM Islam
PhD-student
E-Mail:
islam.towhidul@med.uni-goettingen.de
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