Pediatric cardiology

The research activities of the Department of Pediatric Cardiology and Intensive Care mainly focus on these projects:

1. Biocompatibility examinations of cardiovascular implants

2. Effects of the application of cryo energy on the growing myocardium

3. Metabolic modulation and molecular regulation of the cardiac energy metabolism in children with cyanotic heart defects

Biocompatibility screening in cardiovascular implants

Serving as a national reference center, we have established an implant biocompatibility laboratory. A large number of explants (both human and from animal experiments) has been worked up using a standard protocol for histological and immunohistochemical evaluation. The investigations focus on  tissue reactions on vascular stents, occlusion devices for interventional closure of septal heart defects, pulmonary artery conduits, and many other cardiovascular implants (aorta pulmonary shunts, Mustard baffles, Fontan tunnel).  

Effects of the application of cryo energy on the growing myocardium

RF-current ablation of the anatomic substrate is an established procedure in children and adolescents suffering from supraventricular tachycardias. In animal tests on the growing myocardium our working group has shown that the application of RF-current may lead to obstructions of the coronary arteries and to an increasing lesion size in the growing heart. Bearing this aspect in mind we carried out a comparative animal study of the cryo energy application on the growing myocardium. Based on the results of this comparison, it is possible to recommend a primary choice of the energy source to be used for the ablation of arrythmogenic substrates in children.   

Metabolic modulation and molecular regulation of the cardiac energy metabolism in children with cyanotic heart defects

The heart of a child with a cyanotic heart defect is frequently forced to work with a reduced oxygen supply for many years. As the heart is an organ most sensitive to ischemia and hypoxia, the reduced oxygen supply results in a non-physiological adaptation of the postnatal cardiac energy metabolism. The aim of our project is to better understand the cardiac energy metabolism in hypoxia-ischemic situations, thereby turning our attention to two central regulators – the transcription factors of the Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptors (PPAR) and the AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK). The obtained insights may possibly optimize future therapy of children with cyanotic heart defects through a targeted metabolic modulation.



Contact
PD Dr. med. Thomas Kriebel
Phone:
0551-39-6233
E-Mail:
tkriebe@gwdg.de
Dr. rer. nat. Thomas Quentin
Phone:
0551-39-66233
E-Mail:
quentin892@hotmail.com
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