Translational cardiology

A major focus of the working group of Translational Cardiology are molecular mechanisms, which control muscle function and pathophysiological changes due to disease. We use a variety of techniques including molecular biology, biophysics, cell biology, imaging (Zeiss 710 confocal microscopy; STED microscopy; voltage mapping), transgenic models and comprehensive phenotyping methods of the heart. In particular, calcium transport proteins and measurements of intracellular calcium signals are of great interest. An important example are cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR2) calcium release channels, which control cardiac contraction and relaxation and modulate physiological stress adaptation during the fight-or-flight response. On the other hand, RyR2 dysfunction results in intracellular calcium "leak", which may contribute to reduced cardiac contraction in heart failure and/or to ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. Increased intracellular calcium "leak" may contribute to maladaptive cardiac remodeling through changes in gene expression, and these mechanisms are investigated. Genetic studies have found that RyR2 mutations in patients cause a disease syndrome called Catecholaminergic Polymorphic Ventricular Tachycardia (CPVT) which is characterized by stress-induced syncope and sudden death. Ryanodine receptors and other calcium transport proteins may directly contribute to the initiation of arrhythmias, and these mechanisms are investigated. A large part of our research activities is "translational" by nature and contributes to increased understanding of the molecular basis of diseases like heart failure and sudden cardiac death. Additionally, novel diagnostic and therapeutic strategies are developed and tested. The working group of Translational Cardiology is part of a shared lab and project concept together with the working group of Pharmacology (Prof. Zimmermann), the Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization (Prof. Bodenschatz) including the Biomedical Physics Group (Prof. Luther). Additionally we collaborate with the Max Planck Institute of Biophysical Chemistry, Dept. of NanoBiophotonics (Prof. Hell).

Further information

Dr. Lehnart coordinates a person exchange program Germany to USA between Göttingen (Lehnart lab) and Baltimore (University of Maryland Baltimore, Lederer lab) supported by the German Academic Exchange Service DAAD.


Contact
Prof. Dr. Stephan E. Lehnart
Coordinator Translational Cardiology
Phone:
+49 (0)551 39 10575
Fax:
+49 (0)551 39 10650
E-Mail:
slehnart@med.uni-goettingen.de
Anja Janssen
Project assistent EUTrigTreat
Phone:
+49 (0)551 39 10574
Fax:
+49 (0)551 39 10650
E-Mail:
anja.janssen@med.uni-goettingen.de
Location:
4 D2 342
Telelift:
194
Miroslav Dura Ph.D.
Phone:
+49 (0)551 39 12644
Fax:
+49 (0)551 39 10650
E-Mail:
miroslav.dura@med.uni-goettingen.de
Konstantin Gusev Ph.D.
Phone:
+49 (0)551 39 12644
Fax:
+49 (0)551 39 10650
E-Mail:
konstantin.gusev@med.uni-goettingen.de
Dr. rer. nat. Tobias Kohl
Phone:
+49 (0)551 39 12644
Fax:
+49 (0)551 39 10650
E-Mail:
tobias.kohl@med.uni-goettingen.de
Brigitte Korff
Medical laboratory technician
Phone:
+49 (0)551 39 8068
Fax:
+49 (0)551 39 10650
E-Mail:
brigitte.korff@med.uni-goettingen.de
Dipl.-Biol. Falko Matthes
Phone:
+49 (0)551 39 10424
Fax:
+49 (0)551 39 10650
E-Mail:
falko.matthes@med.uni-goettingen.de
Birgit Schumann
Medical laboratory technician
Phone:
+49 (0)551 39 8068
Fax:
+49 (0)551 39 10650
E-Mail:
birgit.schumann@med.uni-goettingen.de
Dipl.-Biol. Julia Hanni Steinbrecher
Phone:
+49 (0)551 39 10815
Pager:
919 2683
Fax:
+49 (0)551 39 10650
E-Mail:
julia.steinbrecher@med.uni-goettingen.de
Dipl.-Biol. Eva Wagner
PhD student
Phone:
+49 (0)551 39 10815
Fax:
+49 (0)551 39 10650
E-Mail:
eva.wagner@med.uni-goettingen.de
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